Posted by Competitive Edge Real Estate Services on 12/12/2018

Looks can be deceiving! This extended ranch will pleasantly surprise you! Tailored, clean and timeless design makes the house a home. Craftsman style front door leads into living room with decorative fireplace, hardwood floor and cathedral ceiling. The new bow window lets in a ton of light through the open floor plan to the kitchen with cathedral ceiling, recessed lights, stainless steel appliances and eat in area. Open to the dining room with cathedral ceiling and access to the back deck. Enjoy your private master suite with propane fireplace, his and her organizer closets, vaulted ceiling, new carpet, french doors to access back yard, tons of over head storage. Master bath has washer and dryer hook up. 2nd bedroom suite with hardwood floor, double closet and its own bath. 3rd bedroom with hardwood floors, double closet and access to its own deck! In warmer weather you are surrounded by greenery in the private back yard. Front yard has a sprawling patio and perennial gardens.

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Posted by Competitive Edge Real Estate Services on 12/11/2018

When you’ve gone through the lengthy and tiring process of seeking out, bidding on, and buying a new home and then sell your home, the last thing you want to worry about is cleaning your old house before you leave.

 However, there’s multiple reasons you’ll want to ensure your old house is clean before you leave. First, as a common courtesy, you’ll want the new owners of your home to have a good first experience and to maintain your rapport with them after closing day. However, there are also legal and financial issues at play.

If your contract states that your home needs to have been “broom-swept” or some other form of cleaning before you leave, then your new owners could technically postpone closing. Furthermore, some states have laws requiring that homes are cleaned by their previous owners before they move out.

 Although it can be difficult to define just how clean a home needs to be, legally speaking, your best option is to do your part to leave the home relatively clean, whether that means cleaning it yourself or hiring a cleaning company.

Legal reasons for cleaning your old house

As mentioned earlier, some states state cleaning requirements in the purchase contract when you sell your home. Their definitions of clean can often be vague, but usually include sweeping floors, wiping down surfaces, stripping nails and hangers from walls, and carrying out all furniture and garbage.

These rules are mostly designed to protect people who purchase a home from getting stuck with bulk items and other surprise issues that they’ll have to pay for.

An exception to this is when your home is sold “as is” or when you have some form of written agreement between you and the new owner that some part f your home will be left as is.

Cleaning your house

The ideal time to clean your house is once you’ve moved everything out. However, if you’re moving over a long distance, you might not be able to return to the house once it’s empty to give it a final cleaning.

In this case, your best option is to have your furniture and boxes packed away neatly in the garage, or in the corner of one room. Doing so will allow you to sweep, clean surfaces, wipe down cabinets, and so on, while your belongings are still in the house.

Just be sure to keep a broom handy once you’ve put everything on the moving truck so you can give one last sweep of the floor before you say goodbye to your old home.

Cleaning checklist

It can be difficult to keep track of everything you’ll want to clean before you move out, so here’s a list to go by:

  • Sweep all floors

  • Vacuum all carpets

  • Wipe down cabinets, shelves

  • Try to sweep under appliances, oven, etc.

  • Spray sinks and tubs, leave air freshener in bathroom

  • Wipe inside of refrigerator, if applicable

  • Remove all nails from walls

  • Do a final walkthrough and remove any trash you’ve missed




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Posted by Competitive Edge Real Estate Services on 12/7/2018

Fantastic opportunity! Oversized & updated Split Entry home with in law apt. This homes features bright white kitchen, new granite counters with breakfast bar, freshly painted throughout, new stylish flooring in main area & new wall to wall in bedrooms. Expansive living/dining area with open concept, three bedrooms and bath in main home. Kitchen opens to oversize deck overlooking private & scenic rear yard. In law apt offers internal open elevator for handicap accessibility. Oak kitchen cabinets & bonus desk area, a good sized bedroom, wide open living/dining area, all freshly painted. Two car garage, huge basement with tons of storage, circular drive and additional parking space. Beautiful yard with over an acre of land. Minutes to commuter rail & major routes!

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Posted by Competitive Edge Real Estate Services on 12/4/2018

Many homeowners are unaware that the most common causes of house fires are cooking related. According to data from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), cooking fires cause 46% of house fires and 44% of household injuries.

You aren’t alone if you think those numbers are shockingly high. However, most of us are never taught cooking safety techniques. In this article, we’re going to give you some tips to protect you and your family from the most common and some lesser known causes of kitchen fires. 

Cooking fire statistics 

Knowing the most common causes of cooking fires is a great way to understand just how dangerous certain types of cooking really are. The NFPA reports that frying is the most dangerous type of cooking. Two-thirds of cooking fires were the result of the ignition of food and cooking materials.

In terms of equipment, the range or cooktop is the most dangerous part of the kitchen, causing over 60% of fires. However, much of the time the cause comes down to leaving your equipment unattended.

Cooking safely

One of the most important things you can do to reduce the risk of house fires is to stay in the kitchen while you’re cooking. Unattended ranges, stovetops, and ovens can be particularly deadly since they can happen as a result of someone dozing off while watching television, or someone forgetting they left a burner on after they go to sleep.

A good way to monitor your cooking is to always use a timer, even if you don’t necessarily need one for the cooking that you’re doing. Also, be sure that your smoke detectors are working and that you have a functional fire extinguisher in your home. Make sure your family knows what to do if they encounter a fire.

Before you turn on your burners before frying, make sure there is nothing around your oven that can catch fire. A food container, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper towels, or curtains could all potentially catch fire if they come in close contact with a burner.

Clothing is also a leading cause of kitchen fires that turn fatal. Make sure sleeves and other pieces of clothing aren’t near any burners or open flames.

In case of fire

If you encounter a large cooking fire that is spreading throughout, the best thing to do is to immediately gather your family and get out of the house, avoiding the kitchen entirely. Call 9-1-1 as soon as you are safely outside and don’t re-enter the house under any circumstances.

For small grease fires, smother the fire with a lid and turn off the burner immediately.

Understanding cooking fires

Most fire requires oxygen to burn and spread. If there is a small fire in your kitchen, using a soaked towel or a pan lid to smother it will suffice.

However, grease fires work differently. Never put water on a grease fire, this can cause the fire to spread very quickly. Rather, use a lid to put out the fire if it is small enough to get near. You can also throw baking soda, or use a fire extinguisher on a small grease fire.




Tags: Cooking   home safety   kitchen  
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Posted by Competitive Edge Real Estate Services on 11/29/2018

Meticulously cared for updated end unit condo at Carter Green! Living room has recessed lights, updated slider leads to the freshly stained deck with open space view. Kitchen has oak cabinets, recessed lights, new energy efficient appliances and faucet. Dining room opens to the front hall and entrance. Half bath with new faucet and toilet. Hardwood floors through out the first floor. Second floor master, hardwood floors, double closets and main bathroom entrance. Second bedroom with walk in closet and main bath entrance. Main bath has tiled flooring, new faucet and toilet. Second floor laundry. Basement walk in to finished hallway, double coat closet, tiled flooring. Additional storage in utility room and under stairs. One car garage with storage. Great location, great view, first building in complex from Victor Drive entrance.

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